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Franz Kafka died in Klosterneuburg, Lower Austria, Austria on this day in 1924 (aged 40). His body was brought back to Prague where he was buried on 11 June 1924, in the New Jewish Cemetery in Prague-Žižkov. “I think we ought to read only the kind of books that wound and stab us. If the book we are reading doesn’t wake us up with a blow on the head, what are we reading it for? …we need the books that affect us like a disaster, that grieve us deeply, like the death of someone we loved more than ourselves, like being banished into forests far from everyone, like a suicide. A book must be the axe for the frozen sea inside us.” —from a Letter to Oskar Pollak (27 January 1904)

vintageanchorbooks:

Franz Kafka died in Klosterneuburg, Lower Austria, Austria on this day in 1924 (aged 40). His body was brought back to Prague where he was buried on 11 June 1924, in the New Jewish Cemetery in Prague-Žižkov.

“I think we ought to read only the kind of books that wound and stab us. If the book we are reading doesn’t wake us up with a blow on the head, what are we reading it for? …we need the books that affect us like a disaster, that grieve us deeply, like the death of someone we loved more than ourselves, like being banished into forests far from everyone, like a suicide. A book must be the axe for the frozen sea inside us.”
—from a Letter to Oskar Pollak (27 January 1904)

View of Casa Marina, where Wallace Stevens stayed during his annual visits to Key West between 1922 and 1940. You’ll find no plaque commemorating the poetry he wrote there, nor will the staff of the hotel know who you’re talking about if you ask after him, so the only way that the ghost of Wallace Stevens can follow you on the beaches and streets of Key West is if you take him with you.  

A figure half seen, or seen for a moment, a man 
Of the mind, an apparition apparelled in
Apparels of such lightest look that a turn 
Of my shoulder and quickly, too quickly, I am gone?

—from ”Angel Surrounded by Paysans" by Wallace Stevens

View of Casa Marina, where Wallace Stevens stayed during his annual visits to Key West between 1922 and 1940. You’ll find no plaque commemorating the poetry he wrote there, nor will the staff of the hotel know who you’re talking about if you ask after him, so the only way that the ghost of Wallace Stevens can follow you on the beaches and streets of Key West is if you take him with you.  

A figure half seen, or seen for a moment, a man 

Of the mind, an apparition apparelled in

Apparels of such lightest look that a turn 

Of my shoulder and quickly, too quickly, I am gone?

from ”Angel Surrounded by Paysans" by Wallace Stevens